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Laporan HAM Papua

Buku-buku ini merupakan hasil kerjasama Elsham Papua dengan lembaga HAM lainnya di Indonesia
“I AM HERE: Voices of Papuan Women in the Face of Unrelenting Violence” Participatory Action Research Report

Since November 2015, Asia Justice and Rights (AJAR) has worked with the Papuan Women Working Group (PWG), consisting of women activists, religious leaders and human rights organisations, with the goal to understand deeper the experiences of women victims of violence in the provinces of Papua and West Papua. The findings of our participatory action research with indigenous Papuan women are found in our report “SA ADA DI SINI: Suara Perempuan Papua Menghadapi Kekerasan yang Tak Kunjung Usai” (I AM HERE: Voices of Papuan Women in the Face of Unrelenting Violence).
To share our findings with the wider public, AJAR held two events in Jakarta. The first one was a two-day Papuan women’s awareness campaign at the Goethe Institute in Jakarta, 7-8 October 2017, which featured a photo exhibition, panel discussions, a film screening of “Sa Ada Di Sini,” a music and arts night featuring Papuan artists and a noken workshop. The second event was a public discussion at the Lembaga Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia (LIPI – the Indonesian Institute of Sciences), involving academics, government staff, and civil society members.

Download “Sa Ada Di Sini” report (Bahasa Indonesia)

Video

The Practice of Torture: Business As Usual in Papua

This policy paper, based on a research conducted by the Institution for Research and Advocacy of Human Rights (ELSHAM) Papua, Asia Justice and Rights (AJAR) and TAPOL, documents acts of torture and inhuman treatment in Papua from the 1960’s to the present. Based on 18 case studies of torture (from both male and female victims in Biak, Jayapura, Manokwari, Sorong, Fakfak and Paniai regions), this paper contributes to the record of torture and large scale human rights violations that are yet to be addressed by the government of Indonesia.

The paper also include conclusion and recommendation to the government of Papua and the Parliament of Papua, the Indonesian Government and the International community to promote accountability and prevent Torture in Papua.

Download PDF (English Version)

The Practice of Torture: Business As Usual in Papua

This policy paper, based on a research conducted by the Institution for Research and Advocacy of Human Rights (ELSHAM) Papua, Asia Justice and Rights (AJAR) and TAPOL, documents acts of torture and inhuman treatment in Papua from the 1960’s to the present. Based on 18 case studies of torture (from both male and female victims in Biak, Jayapura, Manokwari, Sorong, Fakfak and Paniai regions), this paper contributes to the record of torture and large scale human rights violations that are yet to be addressed by the government of Indonesia.

The paper also include conclusion and recommendation to the government of Papua and the Parliament of Papua, the Indonesian Government and the International community to promote accountability and prevent Torture in Papua.

Download PDF (Indonesia Version)

The Past That Has Not Passed: Human Rights Violations in Papua Before and After Reformasi

A joint report released today by the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) and the Institute for Human Rights Study and Advocacy (ELSHAM-Papua) provides important insight into the ongoing debate on steps required to achieve a sustainable peace in Papua.

Based on more than 100 interviews carried out in 2011 in the districts of Sorong, Manokwari, Biak, and Paniai, the report reviews Papua’s recent history, including the Special Autonomy Law governing the relationship between the Papua province and Indonesia, within a transitional justice framework. It also reveals new information provided in testimonies by victims and witnesses who experienced human rights violations going back to the earliest days of Indonesia’s history as a nation.

“Even as we were conducting this research, new outbreaks of violence and cases of gross human rights violations continued to take place,” said Ferry Marisan, director of ELSHAM. “We interviewed more than 100 victims, many of whom have deep feelings of distrust that are deeply rooted in the past and present experiences of human rights abuse. Official acknowledgement of this violent past is a prerequisite to building peace in Papua,” he added.

Unless these grievances are not only recognized, but also addressed in a practical way, reconciliation will remain elusive. A comprehensive transitional justice strategy could provide effective redress, and should include truth-seeking, criminal accountability, reparations, institutional reform to prevent recurrence of human rights violations, and a focus on the rights of indigenous women.

“The Indonesian government must urgently develop a comprehensive policy for dealing with this legacy of past violations. We are at risk of repeating the past through using force to deal with unrest, instead of opening a process of genuine dialogue. The first step is acknowledgment,” said Galuh Wandita, ICTJ’s senior associate.

Download the full publication here ICTJ-ELSHAM-Indonesia-Papua-2012-English

The Past That Has Not Passed: Human Rights Violations in Papua Before and After Reformasi

A joint report released today by the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) and the Institute for Human Rights Study and Advocacy (ELSHAM-Papua) provides important insight into the ongoing debate on steps required to achieve a sustainable peace in Papua.

Based on more than 100 interviews carried out in 2011 in the districts of Sorong, Manokwari, Biak, and Paniai, the report reviews Papua’s recent history, including the Special Autonomy Law governing the relationship between the Papua province and Indonesia, within a transitional justice framework. It also reveals new information provided in testimonies by victims and witnesses who experienced human rights violations going back to the earliest days of Indonesia’s history as a nation.

“Even as we were conducting this research, new outbreaks of violence and cases of gross human rights violations continued to take place,” said Ferry Marisan, director of ELSHAM. “We interviewed more than 100 victims, many of whom have deep feelings of distrust that are deeply rooted in the past and present experiences of human rights abuse. Official acknowledgement of this violent past is a prerequisite to building peace in Papua,” he added.

Unless these grievances are not only recognized, but also addressed in a practical way, reconciliation will remain elusive. A comprehensive transitional justice strategy could provide effective redress, and should include truth-seeking, criminal accountability, reparations, institutional reform to prevent recurrence of human rights violations, and a focus on the rights of indigenous women.

“The Indonesian government must urgently develop a comprehensive policy for dealing with this legacy of past violations. We are at risk of repeating the past through using force to deal with unrest, instead of opening a process of genuine dialogue. The first step is acknowledgment,” said Galuh Wandita, ICTJ’s senior associate.

Download the full publication here ICTJ-ELSHAM-Indonesia-Papua-2012-Bahasa

“Enough Is Enough!” Testimonies of Papuan Women Victims of Violence and Human Rights Violations 1963–2009

“We women of Papua have been bruised, cornered, besieged from all directions. We are not safe at home, and even less so outside the home. The burden we bear to feed our children is too heavy. The history of the Papuan people is covered in blood, and women are no exception as victims of the violence of blind military actions. We have experienced rape and sexual abuse in detention, in the grasslands, while seeking refuge, no matter where we were when the army and police conducted operations in the name of security.”

In 2009–2010, ICTJ, the Women Commission, and the Women Working Group of Papuan People Assembly provided support to Papuan women in a project to document gender-based violence and human rights violations that occurred between 1963 and 2009. This documentation effort aims to understand different patterns of violence, including abuses committed by security forces and resulting from efforts to seize natural resources in Papua, as well as violence women have experienced in their own households since the army took control of the region in 1963. Of the regions in Indonesia, Papua—on the verge of becoming independent when Soehato gained power—experienced some of the highest rates of atrocities committed under the regime. And recent crackdowns in Papua indicate the government is still adopting a heavy-handed security approach.

The women in Papua worked on this collection of stories of violence and abuse over three months, interviewing 261 people (243 women and 18 men). The report finds that a range of factors within Papua—violence employed by security forces, a culture of discrimination against women, and lack of political will to change policies among others—have meant the victims are still neglected and none of the effects of violence have been addressed. “Change cannot be postponed any longer,” the women conclude.

Download PDF (English Version)

“Enough Is Enough!” Testimonies of Papuan Women Victims of Violence and Human Rights Violations 1963–2009

“We women of Papua have been bruised, cornered, besieged from all directions. We are not safe at home, and even less so outside the home. The burden we bear to feed our children is too heavy. The history of the Papuan people is covered in blood, and women are no exception as victims of the violence of blind military actions. We have experienced rape and sexual abuse in detention, in the grasslands, while seeking refuge, no matter where we were when the army and police conducted operations in the name of security.”

In 2009–2010, ICTJ, the Women Commission, and the Women Working Group of Papuan People Assembly provided support to Papuan women in a project to document gender-based violence and human rights violations that occurred between 1963 and 2009. This documentation effort aims to understand different patterns of violence, including abuses committed by security forces and resulting from efforts to seize natural resources in Papua, as well as violence women have experienced in their own households since the army took control of the region in 1963. Of the regions in Indonesia, Papua—on the verge of becoming independent when Soehato gained power—experienced some of the highest rates of atrocities committed under the regime. And recent crackdowns in Papua indicate the government is still adopting a heavy-handed security approach.

The women in Papua worked on this collection of stories of violence and abuse over three months, interviewing 261 people (243 women and 18 men). The report finds that a range of factors within Papua—violence employed by security forces, a culture of discrimination against women, and lack of political will to change policies among others—have meant the victims are still neglected and none of the effects of violence have been addressed. “Change cannot be postponed any longer,” the women conclude.

Download PDF (Indonesia Version)